Liking Your Photos

I spend a lot of time looking through my photos trying to decide what I like and what I don’t and what I will share on social media. Maybe I don’t even spend enough time making those decisions because I take so many photos!

When I decide that I like a photo or not, it’s more about how I feel about the photo rather than looking at it with a “critical” eye.

I also spend a lot of time looking at photos by others. Some well known and many who are not well known. I am often in awe of their work. The thing I don’t see are the photos that they reject and what it took for them to arrive at their current work.

Likewise, you don’t see the photos that I reject! I’m not just talking about bad exposures or really missing the shot either though they are certainly a factor. What I like or don’t like today may change in the future. It does happen that way.

The New Stellar, New York City, March 2019

When looking at the work of others, photography can be very deceiving. It often “looks” easy. It can be discouraging if you try too hard to imitate the work of others or if you imagine that everything that they do is perfect.

What’s really great about viewing the work of other photographers is that it often gives license to do things that you might not otherwise do! Have you ever looked at a photo that you really liked and said oh, I did that once and I didn’t think it was a good shot? It has happened to me many times.

So maybe it’s not so much about quantity in photography but quality. The more that you give yourself license to experiment in photography and pursue photography that you are happy with, the better you become.

That is true no matter what level you are at in photography. Perhaps even more so if you are really experienced. Why you ask? Because many photographers once they hit a certain level rest on what has worked for them in the past and don’t continue to evolve their art.

For newer photographers, it’s often a fear of not being accepted. Which is unfortunate. I spent many years in that mode of shooting. The most important thing is that you are pleased with your work and that you recognize the work that you are happy with rather than focusing on the ones you don’t like.

Somewhere between the two you can determine what to focus on and how to achieve that. Perhaps it takes a little courage. But it is worth it. Happy shooting! And yes, it helps if you’re happy when you’re shooting!

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